July 2010

  • Santos, Laurie R., Flombaum, Jonathan I., Phillips, Webb (2007) The Evolution of Human Mindreading: How Non-Human Primates Can Inform Social Cognitive Neuroscience, in Evolutionary Cognitive Neuroscience ed. Platek, S. (MIT Press)
  • Stulp, Gert, et al. (2009) Western scrub-jays conceal auditory information when competitors can hear but cannot see. Biology Letters: Animal Behavior 5, 583-585
  • Kaminski, Juliane, Call, Josep, Tomasello, Michael (2008) Chimpanzees know what others know, but not what they believe. Cognition 109, 224-234
  • Rogers, John et al. (2006) Autism spectrum disorder and psychopathy: shared cognitive underpinnings or double hit? Psychological Medicine 36, 1789-1798.
  • Frith, C. D. (2004) Schizophrenia and theory of mind. Psychological Medicine 34, 385-389
  • Senju, Atsushi et al. (2009) Mindblind Eyes: An Absence of Spontaneous Theory of Mind in Asperger Syndrome. Science 325, 883-885
  • Atance, Cristina M., O'Neill, Daniela K. (2004) Acting and Planning on the Basis of a False Belief: Its Effects on 3-Year-Old Children's Reasoning About Their Own False Beliefs. Developmental Psychology. 40(6) 951-964.
  • Gazzaniga, M. S., LeDoux, J. E., Wilson, D. H. (1977) Language, praxis, and the right hemisphere: Clues to some mechanisms of consciousness. Neurology 27;1144.
  • Carruthers, Peter (2008) How we know our own minds: The relationship between mindreading and metacognition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences
  • Mikhail, John (2007) Universal moral grammar: theory, evidence and the future. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11(4)
  • Tetlock PE (2003) Thinking the unthinkable: sacred values and taboo cognitions. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7(7)
  • Mitchell, J. P. (2008). Activity in right temporo-parietal junction is not selective for theory-of-mind.Cerebral Cortex. 18(2), 262-271.
  • Saxe R, (In Press) The right temporo-parietal junction: a brain region for thinking about thoughts.
  • Perner, J., M. Aichorn, et al. (2006). Thinking of mental and other representations: the roles of left and right temporo-parietal junction. Social Neuroscience 1(3-4))
  • Pyers & Senghas (2009) Language Promotes False Belief Understanding. Psychological Science 20(7) 805-812.
  • de Villiers PA (2005) in Why Language Matters for Theory of Mind, eds Astington JW, Baird JA (Oxford Univ Press, Oxford), pp 266 –297.
  • Apperly, I. A., D. Samson, et al. (2006). Intact first- and second-order false belief reasoning in a patient with severly impaired grammar. Social Neuroscience. 1 (3-4):334-348
  • June 2010

  • Saxe, R. (2005). Against simulation: The argument from error. Trends in Cognitive Sciences. 9(4), 174-179.
  • Keysers, C. and Gazzola, V. (2007). Integrating simulation and theory of mind: From self to social cognition. Trends in Cognitive Sciences. 11(5), 194-196
  • Apperly, I. A. (2008). Beyond simulation-theory and theory-theory: Why social cognitive neuroscience should use its own concepts to study "theory of mind." Cognition, 107(1), 266-283.
  • Southgate, et al. (2007) Action anticipation through attribution of false belief by 2-year-olds. Psychological Science.
  • Apperly, I. A., & Butterfill, S. A. (2009). Do humans have two systems to track beliefs and belief-like states? Psychological Review.
  • Wellman, H. M., Cross, D., & Watson, J. (2001). Meta-analysis of theory-of-mind development: the truth about false belief. Child Development 72, 655-684.
  • Saxe, R. & Kanwisher, N (2003) People thinking about thinking people: The role of the temporo-parietal junction in "theory of mind". Neuroimage. 19, 1835-1842
  • Saxe, R. (in press) Theory of Mind (Neural Basis). Encyclopedia of Consciousness.
  • Saxe, R. (2006) Why and how to study theory of mind with fMRI Brain Research. 1079(1), 57-65